Word Is Murder
by Horowitz, Anthony






The best-selling author of Moriarty reinvents himself as the fictional sidekick of a disgraced police detective whose dark and mysterious secrets complicate the case of a woman found strangled hours after planning her own funeral. 100,000 first printing.





*Starred Review* Actually, the word is not murder, it's ingenious. Horowitz, who out-Christied Christie in Magpie Murders (2017), now out-Doyles Doyle by inserting himself (his actual self) into the story as the Watson-like narrator of a murder investigation he is drawn into by a brilliant and eccentric detective, Daniel Hawthorne. No one arranges her own funeral at 11 a.m. on a beautiful spring day and then gets herself murdered a mere six hours later in her own home, right? Well, Diane Cowper manages to do just that. No CCTV footage, fingerprints, or DNA traces, and no sign of a break-in, so the only clue to go on is that the victim must have opened the door to her assailant. Hawthorne has been called in as a consultant by the police and invites Horowitz to tag along because he wants the author to write a book about him. Horowitz, who started out as a television screenwriter, creating both the acclaimed Midsomer Murders and Foyle's War, finds real crime unlike anything he ever experienced while holding a cleverly devised script on a carefully designed set. Not to mention a dangerous one. A masterful meta-mystery.HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: The mega-popular Horowitz has been granted the rights to continue both the Arthur Conan Doyle legacy and Ian Fleming's James Bond saga and is known to younger fans as the writer of the Alex Rider series. His star will only shine more brightly. Copyright 2018 Booklist Reviews.





Television writer/Christie-loving Sherlock-ian Horowitz (Magpie Murders, 2017, etc.) spins a fiendishly clever puzzle about a television writer/Christie-loving Sherlock-ian named Anthony Something who partners with a modern Sherlock Holmes to solve a baffling case. Six hours after widowed London socialite Diana Cowper calls on mortician Robert Cornwallis to make arrangements for her own funeral, she's suddenly in need of them after getting strangled in her home. The Met calls on murder specialist Daniel Hawthorne, an ex-DI bounced off the force for reasons he'd rather not talk about, and he calls on the narrator ("nobody ever calls me Tony"), a writer in between projects whose agent expects him to be working on The House of Silk, a Holmes-ian pastiche which Horowitz happens to have published in real life. Anthony's agreement with Hawthorne to collaborate on a true-crime account of the case is guaranteed to blindside his agent (in a bad way) and most readers (in entrancingly g ood ways). Diana Cowper, it turns out, is not only the mother of movie star Damian Cowper, but someone who had her own brush with fame 10 years ago when she accidentally ran over a pair of 8-year-old twins, killing Timothy Godwin and leaving Jeremy Godwin forever brain-damaged. A text message Diana sent Damian moments before her death—"I have seen the boy who was lacerated and I'm afraid"—implicates both Jeremy, who couldn't possibly have killed her, and the twins' estranged parents, Alan and Judith Godwin, who certainly could have. But which of them, or which other imaginable suspect, would have sneaked a totally unpredictable surprise into her coffin and then rushed out to commit another murder? Though the impatient, tightfisted, homophobic lead detective is impossible to love, the mind-boggling plot triumphs over its characters: Sharp-witted readers who think they've solved the puzzle early on can rest assured that they've opened only one of many dazzling Chri s tmas packages Horowitz has left beautifully wrapped under the tree. Copyright Kirkus 2018 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






Terms of Use   ©Copyright 2018 Follett School Solutions