Last Mrs. Parrish
by Constantine, Liv






A coolly manipulative woman worms her way into the lives of a wealthy golden couple from Connecticut as part of her plot to achieve a privileged life, unveiling dark secrets along the way. 75,000 first printing.





The twists keep coming in this psychological roller coaster from debut author Constantine, the pen name of sisters Lynne and Valerie Constantine. The novel, which portrays a complicated friendship between two women, opens with Amber Patterson worming her way into the affections of a guileless acquaintance, all the while seeking to leave her humble beginnings behind and bag a trophy husband. No spoilers here, but things don't go as Amber or readers expect. The surprises come amid a sometimes-too-lengthy tale of betrayal and abuse-one wishes that Amber's part of the tale, particularly, would speed up-but overall this is a satisfying thriller that offers a window into the darker side of glamorous lives and powerful men. Copyright 2017 Booklist Reviews.





A wealthy woman with a handsome husband is preyed on by a ruthless con artist.One day at the gym, Amber Patterson drops the magazine she's reading between her exercise bike and that of the woman who happens to be beside her, Daphne Parrish. As she bends to pick it up, Daphne notices that it's the publication of a cystic fibrosis foundation. What a coincidence—Daphne's sister died of cystic fibrosis, and, why, so did Amber's! "Slowing her pace, Amber wiped her eyes with the back of her hand. It took a lot of acting skills to cry about a sister who never existed." Step one complete. "All she needed from Daphne was everything." Everything, in this case, consists of Daphne's outlandishly wealthy and blisteringly hot husband, Jackson, and all the real estate that comes with him; Daphne can definitely keep her two whiny brats. Amber hates children. But once she finds out that Daphne's failure to give Jackson a male heir is the main source of tension in the marriage, she sees exactly how to make this work. Amber's constant, spiteful inner monologue as she plays up to Daphne is the best thing about this book. For example, as Daphne talks about the many miseries her sister Julie went through before her death, Amber is thinking, "At least Julie had grown up in a nice house with money and parents who cared about her. Okay, she was sick and then she died. So what? A lot of people were sick. A lot of people died.…How about Amber and what she'd gone through?" Meanwhile, poor, stupid Daphne is so caught up in the joy of finally having a friend, she seems to be handing Jackson to her on a platter. Constantine's debut novel is the work of two sisters in collaboration, and these ladies definitely know the formula. A Gone Girl-esque confection with villainy and melodrama galore. Copyright Kirkus 2017 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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