Dead Land
by Paretsky, Sara






When she is dragged by her impetuous goddaughter into a legal battle over a clandestine deal that is threatening community land, V. I. Warshawski uncovers a developer scheme that ends the life of the young man her goddaughter is dating.





*Starred Review* In this series bar-raiser, dauntless private detective V. I. "Vic" Warshawski digs into a famous musician's disappearance and uncovers a web of greed linking the South Side of Chicago, rural Kansas, and a Chilean mining town. As Vic awaits a community group's recognition of her goddaughter Bernie Fouchard's soccer team, the South Lakefront Improvement Council's (SLICK's) landfill-proposal presentation erupts into chaos, sparked by the enraged protests of local hothead Coop. Trekking to their cars, Vic and Bernie encounter a homeless woman pounding soulful music on a toy piano. Bernie insists that the woman is a famous musician, Lydia Zamir, who disappeared after her boyfriend, a migrant-workers' advocate, was murdered. Ignoring angry warnings from Coop, Bernie attempts to draw the musician off the streets. Coop's concern rings true when a young SLICK intern, whom Bernie was dating, is murdered near Zamir's camp, Bernie is targeted in a violent home invasion, and Zamir and Coop disappear. Vic responds, determined to run down the connections between SLICK, Zamir, and a high-powered law firm intensely interested in her investigation. Paretsky is celebrated for bringing Chicago to life through Vic's investigations into corporate wrongdoing and political corruption; here, while again mining that territory, she also offers a full-sensory foray into rural Kansas as Vic hunts for Zamir and Coop while dodging an assassin who somehow predicts her every move. A high point in Paretsky's long-running and much-loved series. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.





*Starred Review* In this series bar-raiser, dauntless private detective V. I. "Vic" Warshawski digs into a famous musician's disappearance and uncovers a web of greed linking the South Side of Chicago, rural Kansas, and a Chilean mining town. As Vic awaits a community group's recognition of her goddaughter Bernie Fouchard's soccer team, the South Lakefront Improvement Council's (SLICK's) landfill-proposal presentation erupts into chaos, sparked by the enraged protests of local hothead Coop. Trekking to their cars, Vic and Bernie encounter a homeless woman pounding soulful music on a toy piano. Bernie insists that the woman is a famous musician, Lydia Zamir, who disappeared after her boyfriend, a migrant-workers' advocate, was murdered. Ignoring angry warnings from Coop, Bernie attempts to draw the musician off the streets. Coop's concern rings true when a young SLICK intern, whom Bernie was dating, is murdered near Zamir's camp, Bernie is targeted in a violent home invasion, and Zamir and Coop disappear. Vic responds, determined to run down the connections between SLICK, Zamir, and a high-powered law firm intensely interested in her investigation. Paretsky is celebrated for bringing Chicago to life through Vic's investigations into corporate wrongdoing and political corruption; here, while again mining that territory, she also offers a full-sensory foray into rural Kansas as Vic hunts for Zamir and Coop while dodging an assassin who somehow predicts her every move. A high point in Paretsky's long-running and much-loved series. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.





V.I. Warshawski's search for a homeless woman with a fraught past leads her deep into a series of political conspiracies that stretch over generations and continents. Bernadine Fouchard, V.I.'s goddaughter, thinks that Lydia Zamir, whose songs about strong women she reveres, was shot dead along with her lover, Hector Palurdo, at a Kansas fundraiser four years ago. She's only half right. The 17 victims ranch hand Arthur Morton shot in Horsethief Canyon include Palurdo but not Zamir, whom V.I. and Bernie happen to hear banging out haunting tunes on a toy piano under a Chicago railroad viaduct. But they glimpse her only momentarily before the traumatized musician flees and eventually disappears. Soon afterward, Bernie finds herself in trouble when the young man she's been dating—Leo Prinz, a summer employee of SLICK, the South Lakefront Improvement Council—is murdered and she becomes a person of considerable interest to Sgt. Lenora Pizzello. The search for Lydia Zamir morphs into an investigation of her relationship with Palurdo, an activist against the Pinochet regime in Chile long before he was shot apparently at random. In the meantime, the disappearance of Simon Lensky, one of SLICK's elected managers, throws a spotlight on the organization's controversial proposal for a new landfill on the South Side. Everyone in the city seems to have strong opinions about the proposal, from Gifford Taggett, superintendent of the Chicago Park District, to Nobel Prize-winning economist Larry Nieland, to an inveterate protestor known only as Coop, who kicks off the story by vanishing after parking his dog with V.I., to her consternation and the ire of her neighbors and her own two dogs. As usual, Paretsky (Shell Game, 2018, etc.) is less interested in identifying whodunit than in uncovering a monstrous web of evil, and this web is one of her densest and most finely woven ever. So fierce, ambitious, and far-reaching that it makes most other mysteries seem like so many petit fours. Copyright Kirkus 2020 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.





V.I. Warshawski's search for a homeless woman with a fraught past leads her deep into a series of political conspiracies that stretch over generations and continents. Bernadine Fouchard, V.I.'s goddaughter, thinks that Lydia Zamir, whose songs about strong women she reveres, was shot dead along with her lover, Hector Palurdo, at a Kansas fundraiser four years ago. She's only half right. The 17 victims ranch hand Arthur Morton shot in Horsethief Canyon include Palurdo but not Zamir, whom V.I. and Bernie happen to hear banging out haunting tunes on a toy piano under a Chicago railroad viaduct. But they glimpse her only momentarily before the traumatized musician flees and eventually disappears. Soon afterward, Bernie finds herself in trouble when the young man she's been dating—Leo Prinz, a summer employee of SLICK, the South Lakefront Improvement Council—is murdered and she becomes a person of considerable interest to Sgt. Lenora Pizzello. The search for Lydia Zamir morphs into an investigation of her relationship with Palurdo, an activist against the Pinochet regime in Chile long before he was shot apparently at random. In the meantime, the disappearance of Simon Lensky, one of SLICK's elected managers, throws a spotlight on the organization's controversial proposal for a new landfill on the South Side. Everyone in the city seems to have strong opinions about the proposal, from Gifford Taggett, superintendent of the Chicago Park District, to Nobel Prize-winning economist Larry Nieland, to an inveterate protestor known only as Coop, who kicks off the story by vanishing after parking his dog with V.I., to her consternation and the ire of her neighbors and her own two dogs. As usual, Paretsky (Shell Game, 2018, etc.) is less interested in identifying whodunit than in uncovering a monstrous web of evil, and this web is one of her densest and most finely woven ever. So fierce, ambitious, and far-reaching that it makes most other mysteries seem like so many petit fours. Copyright Kirkus 2020 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






Terms of Use   ©Copyright 2020 Follett School Solutions