1493 for Young People : From Columbus's Voyage to Globalization
by Mann, Charles C.; Stefoff, Rebecca (ADP)







Introduction About This Book1(14)
PART ONE ONE WORLD
15(38)
Chapter 1 Two Monuments
17(22)
Chapter 2 Reversals Of Fortune
39(14)
PART TWO ATLANTIC JOURNEYS
53(82)
Chapter 3 The Tobacco Coast
55(30)
Chapter 4 Evil Air
85(50)
PART THREE PACIFIC JOURNEYS
135(70)
Chapter 5 Shiploads Of Silver
137(44)
Chapter 6 Lovesick Grass, Foreign Tubers, And Jade Rice
181(24)
PART FOUR EUROPE IN THE WORLD
205(86)
Chapter 7 Potato Power, Potato Pests
207(46)
Chapter 8 Wealth That Grew On Trees
253(38)
PART FIVE AFRICA IN THE WORLD
291(76)
Chapter 9 Crazy Soup
293(36)
Chapter 10 Forest Of Fugitives
329(38)
Afterword Currents Of Life367(10)
Timeline377(10)
Glossary387(8)
Index395(10)
Permissions405


Traces the gripping story of globalization through travel, trade, colonization and migration from the 15th century to the present, documenting the historical impact of influences ranging from potatoes and the rubber plant to malaria and the fabled silver mountain. Simultaneous and eBook.





CHARLES C. MANN is the author of 1493: Uncovering the New World Columbus Created, a New York Times bestseller, and1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus, which won the U.S. National Academy of Sciences' Keck Award for the best book of the year. A correspondent forThe Atlantic Monthly, Science, and Wired, Mann has covered the intersection of science, technology, and commerce for many newspapers and magazines here and abroad, includingNational Geographic, The New York Times, Vanity Fair, and The Washington Post. In addition to 1491 and 1493, he is the co-author of five other books, one of which is a young person's version of 1491 calledBefore Columbus.

REBECCA STEFOFF has devoted her career to writing nonfiction books for young readers. Her publications include histories, literary biographies, an encyclopedia of maps, and numerous books on science and environmental issues. She has also adapted a number of landmark works in history and science: Howard Zinn's A People's History of the United States, Jared Diamond'sThe Third Chimpanzee, and Charles C. Mann's bestselling 1491.





This adaptation of Mann's best-selling 1493 (2011) makes salient points about globalization accessible to teen readers. Inspired by the mystery of how tomatoes came to be cultivated in Ukraine, Mann begins with the cultural impact of this plant and expands to focus on the Columbian Exchange. Whatever the reader's feelings toward this controversial explorer, the author successfully shows how Christopher Columbus' voyage created globalization and the New World. Rather than providing a daunting, complete survey of modern civilization, he concentrates on events with long-standing ecological and economic impact. Some of these include the role of malaria in the development of the U.S., the potato in producing a population explosion in China, and slavery in reshuffling humans around the world. Profiles of influential yet lesser-known individuals, a time line, and copious color photographs, reproductions, and maps give context to these events. A thought-provoking narrative sure to lead to discussion in and out of the classroom. Copyright 2014 Booklist Reviews.





In this sweeping world history, Mann chronicles the spread of globalization, examining the mingling of the world's ecosystems through travel, trade, colonization, conquest, and migration, from its beginnings in the 15th century to its continued impact in the present day. Adapted by Stefoff for teen audiences, this riveting account shows how the complex, interconnected economic and environmental consequences of the European "discovery" of the Americas shaped many unexpected aspects of the modern world. The collision of unfamiliar flora, fauna, and microbes produced unforeseen wealth, conflict, exploitation, disease, misery, and social upheaval. Mann examines such fascinating subjects as the connections between malaria and slavery, how silver mined in Bolivia funded economic development in rural China and wars waged by the Spanish empire, how the rubber plant enabled industrialization, and how the potato plant fed millions of Europe's poor for centuries and then caused the dea ths of millions. All of these fascinating stories are woven together in a clear, compelling narrative. The complex subject matter is impressively handled with deftness and wit. A provocative, gripping account. (photos, maps, timeline, glossary, index) (Nonfiction. 12-18) Copyright Kirkus 2015 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.






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