Black Enough : Stories of Being Young & Black in America
by Zoboi, Ibi (EDT)






A collection of short stories explore what it is like to be young and black, centering on the experiences of black teenagers and emphasizing that one person's experiences, reality, and personal identity are different than someone else.





*Starred Review* What is it like to be young and black, and yet not black enough at the same time? That's the question explored in this poignant collection of stunning short stories by black rock-star authors, including Justina Ireland, Jason Reynolds, Nic Stone, and Brandy Colbert. The stories center on the experience of black teens, while driving home the fact that they are not a monolith; one person's experiences, reality, and personal identity can be completely different from another's. Family, friends, belonging, isolation, classism, and romance are among the topics that take center stage, and the stories' teens come from a diverse array of backgrounds (e.g., economic, neighborhood, country of origin). Readers glimpse the struggles, achievements, heartaches, and joys of a host of black teens who are authentically and lovingly portrayed. From the kid with two black parents to the mixed-race kid with one black parent, all of the characters grapple with the heart-wrenching question most real-life black teens struggle with (and never should need to): Am I black enough? The additional magic of this collection is that it shirks off the literary world's tired obsession with only depicting the struggles of black teens. With this, readers see everyday struggles as well as the ordinary yet remarkable joys of black teens that have nothing to do with the trauma of their history. Grades 9-12. Copyright 2018 Booklist Reviews.





A diverse and compelling fiction anthology that taps 17 established, rising star, and new #ownvoices talents. Editor Zoboi (Pride, 2018, etc.) lays out the collection's purpose: exploring black interconnectedness, traditions, and identity in terms of how they apply to black teens. Given that scope, that most stories are contemporary realistic fiction makes sense (Rita Williams-Garcia's humorous "Whoa!" which dips into the waters of speculative fiction, is a notable exception). Conversely, the characters are incredibly varied, as are the narrative styles. Standouts include the elegant simplicity of Jason Reynolds' "The Ingredients," about a group of boys walking home from the swimming pool; Leah Henderson's "Warning: Color May Fade," about an artist afraid to express herself; the immediacy of Tracey Baptiste's "Gravity," about a #MeToo moment of self-actualization birthed from violation; Renee Watson's reflection on family in "Half a Moon"; and the collection's namesake, Varia n Johnson's "Black Enough," which highlights the paradigm shift that is getting woke. In these stories, black kids are nerds and geeks, gay and lesbian, first gen and immigrants, outdoorsy and artists, conflicted and confused, grieving and succeeding, thriving and surviving—in short, they're fully human. No collection could represent the entire spectrum of blackness, however, the presence of trans, Afro-Latinx, and physically disabled characters is missed: a clarion call for more authentic black-centric collections. A breath of fresh air and a sigh of long overdue relief. Nuanced and necessary. (contributor biographies) (Anthology. 12-18) Copyright Kirkus 2018 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






Terms of Use   ©Copyright 2020 Follett School Solutions