Starflight
by Landers, Melissa






Former high school enemies Solara Brooks and Doran Spaulding must team up when they find themselves aboard a renegade spaceship.





Melissa Landers is a former teacher who left the classroom to pursue other worlds. A proud sci-fi geek, she isn't afraid to wear her Princess Leia costume in public―just ask her embarrassed kids. She lives outside Cincinnati in the small town of Milford Ohio, where she writes romantic space adventures for teens and the young at heart.





Solara and Doran went to the same private academy-she on scholarship and he as the rich football star-but she bested him one too many times at school, and when she offers her engineering skills in exchange for passage to the outer realms to work as a mechanic, he can't resist hiring her-just so she will have to call him "sir." After an accidental stun-gun incident, the two find themselves reluctant allies on a rusty, motley-crewed spaceship headed for the fringes of the galaxy, and a mystery arises that may save Doran from jail. This is a lively tale of romance, space pirates, conspiracy, and made (as opposed to genetic) families. Over the course of the book, all the characters round out nicely, as does the romance, which leavens the drama of life-and-death situations. Landers has a firm hand on the plot, which includes a rousing fight scene or two, as well as a nifty twist at the end. Copyright 2014 Booklist Reviews.





A penniless girl and a wealthy boy, enemies, are stuck together on an outer-space journey. Solara has no family, no connections, and knuckle tattoos advertising her criminal record. She wants to turn her mechanical skills into a vehicle for self-sufficient life in the outer realm, but that's far from Earth, so she needs someone to hire her for the trip and pay her passage. Enter Doran, her high school nemesis, "heir to the galaxy's largest fuel corporation [and] first-string varsity football star." Glaringly visible genre tropes include the gruff, motley spaceship crew that becomes family; the pirates and purposely brain-damaged torturers in pursuit; the alternating-between-protagonists third-person narration; and the enmity between Solara and Doran that will obviously turn to lust and love. Despite a far-future time frame and outer-space setting, Landers' worldbuilding leans on such earthly details as rubber bands, Popsicle sticks, milled cider, funnel cake, and a barn danc e with fiddles (on a distant planet). There are no nonhumans or extraterrestrials, and there is little science or technology beyond the outer-space premise. The protagonists are white; their two brown-skinned shipmates (whose blond "dreadlocks" are mentioned again and again) are stereotypically angry. For multiple narrators, creativity, and suspense in outer space, see Beth Revis' Across the Universe series and Amie Kaufman and Meagan Spooner's Starbound series instead. The less-imaginative end of outer-space adventure romance. (Science fiction/romance. 12-16) Copyright Kirkus 2015 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.






Terms of Use   ©Copyright 2018 Follett School Solutions