We Will Not Be Silent : The White Rose Student Resistance Movement That Defied Adolf Hitler
by Freedman, Russell






"The true story of the White Rose, a group of students in Nazi Germany who were active undercover agents of the resistance movement against Hitler and his regime"-





*Starred Review* Freedman's latest paradigmatic work of narrative nonfiction truly is a profile in courage, as it records the lives of Hans and Sophie Scholl, courageous siblings who helped found the White Rose, a student resistance movement that targeted Hitler's regime in WWII Germany. University students by day, the two-along with other young people-produced freedom-extolling anti-government leaflets, of which thousands of copies were distributed. The Scholls' actions were considered treasonous, and when they were ultimately discovered, the two young people were sentenced to death and executed. But the White Rose movement lived on, turning the Scholls into heroes of legendary status, as evidenced by a memorial to them being placed at Munich University, right alongside a White Rose museum. In this smoothly written, relatively brief book, Freedman recreates the lives of Hans and Sophie, who were models of intelligence, integrity, and bravery. He also brings to life the context for their actions, giving readers an exacting portrait of life and its hideous injustices in Nazi Germany. The milieu is also made vivid through the many black-and-white period photographs, including a number of portraits of Hans, Sophie, and their closest friends. Together they celebrated the human spirit in ways that will be long remembered. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Few people have Freedman's level of cred in youth nonfiction: a Newbery Medal, three Newbery Honor Books, the Sibert Medal, and on and on. Stock up. Copyright 2014 Booklist Reviews.





In the heart of Germany, a student resistance movement called the White Rose took a courageous stand to denounce the Nazis. "They could have chosen to throw bombs," but the young members of the White Rose chose to oppose Nazi Germany with printed words. The clandestine student activists, including Hans and Sophie Scholl and Christoph Probst, wrote leaflets decrying Nazi atrocities, urging German citizens to resist the Nazi government, and denouncing the Nazi "dictatorship of evil." Cranking out thousands of mimeographed leaflets at night in a secret cellar, the students proclaimed to Nazi leaders, "We are your bad conscience," imperiling their lives. Among the wealth of good Holocaust literature available, Freedman's volume stands out for its focus and concision, effectively placing the White Rose in its historical context, telling the story of Nazi Germany without losing the focus on the White Rose, and doing so in just over 100 pages. Archival photographs are effectively i ntegrated into the text, and the typeface at times resembles the typewriter's text on mimeographed leaflets, a nice design choice. The selected bibliography includes volumes for young readers and the superb German-language film Sophie Scholl: The Final Days (2005). A thorough and accessible introduction to the Holocaust and the students who dared to take a stand against evil. (source notes, picture credits, index) (Nonfiction. 10-14) Copyright Kirkus 2015 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.





In the heart of Germany, a student resistance movement called the White Rose took a courageous stand to denounce the Nazis. "They could have chosen to throw bombs," but the young members of the White Rose chose to oppose Nazi Germany with printed words. The clandestine student activists, including Hans and Sophie Scholl and Christoph Probst, wrote leaflets decrying Nazi atrocities, urging German citizens to resist the Nazi government, and denouncing the Nazi "dictatorship of evil." Cranking out thousands of mimeographed leaflets at night in a secret cellar, the students proclaimed to Nazi leaders, "We are your bad conscience," imperiling their lives. Among the wealth of good Holocaust literature available, Freedman's volume stands out for its focus and concision, effectively placing the White Rose in its historical context, telling the story of Nazi Germany without losing the focus on the White Rose, and doing so in just over 100 pages. Archival photographs are effectively i ntegrated into the text, and the typeface at times resembles the typewriter's text on mimeographed leaflets, a nice design choice. The selected bibliography includes volumes for young readers and the superb German-language film Sophie Scholl: The Final Days (2005). A thorough and accessible introduction to the Holocaust and the students who dared to take a stand against evil. (source notes, picture credits, index) (Nonfiction. 10-14) Copyright Kirkus 2016 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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