Little Princes : One Man's Promise to Bring Home the Lost Children of Nepal
by Grennan, Conor







A Note on the Crisis in Nepalix
Prologue1(2)
Part I: The Little Princes3(54)
Part II: Around the World and Back57(38)
Part III: Seven Needles in a Haystack95(58)
Part IV: Into the Mountains153(68)
Part V: Liz221(56)
Afterword277(4)
Acknowledgments281(2)
About Next Generation Nepal283(1)
Index284


Describes how the author's three-month service as a volunteer at the Little Princes Orphanage in war-torn Nepal became a commitment for advocacy and reform when he discovered that many of his young charges were victims rescued from human traffickers.





Conor Grennan volunteered in Nepal at the Little Princes Children's Home in the village of Godawari in oo4,. He would eventually return to Nepal to launch Next Generation Nepal (NGN), a nonprofit organization dedicated to reconnecting trafficked children with their families in postwar Nepal.

Conor is a graduate of the University of Virginia and the NYU Stern School of Business. He currently resides in Connecticut with his wife and son.





Grennan volunteered to spend three months at an orphanage in Nepal, helping to tend 18 children orphaned during the civil war when their villages were attacked by Maoist rebels. It was supposed to be a one-off experience, but when he learned that the children were not orphans but had been taken from their families by a child trafficker who enslaved them, he was pulled into their lives in ways he hadn't anticipated. What followed was another three-month stay that grew into a commitment to establish a separate children's house and attempt to reconnect the children and their families. Grennan details his personal learning curve as he went from a man motivated by making himself look good to a man obsessed with traveling across rugged terrain to reunite families, a childless man learning the joys and agonies of parenthood. He also details the incredible stories of families caught in a civil war, frightened and anxious about the future of their children, and the endearing resiliency of the children themselves, many of them traumatized by war, enslavement, and separation from their families. Copyright 2011 Booklist Reviews.






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